Author Archive

Liz Sacchini

Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia!!!

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Remember that jingle?  How funny that someone decided to look into the nutritional value of chia seeds and discovered they are considered a ‘super food’, defined by the Oxford Dictionary as, “a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being.”   And so I would like to espouse the benefits of chia seeds just as Catherine, our new chef/baker from France, is making chia seeds into an amazing pudding topped with a mixed berry compote and also happens to be vegan, gluten free, and lactose free. Triple whammy.  I have to admit that, until today, I had never had chia seeds in any form that I’m aware of.  I had my inaugural chia pudding taste today for the first time and my taste turned into eating the whole container.  I guess I liked it.  A lot.  Because no matter how healthy and beneficial, I do not consume food I don’t like.  Waste of calories.  Food that is healthy must also taste good or I refuse to eat it.  Refuse.  So here’s what I know about chia seeds:

  1. A big serving of fiber- chia has 11 grams in 1 oz. which is about 2 Tablespoons.  11 grams is over a third of the RDA for fiber.
  2. Protein- they contain 4 grams of high quality plant based protein in the same 2 tablespoons.  And since it is considered a high quality protein, they are an excellent protein source for vegans and vegetarians.
  3. Antioxidants galore!  The antioxidants in chia protect the sensitive fats in the seeds from going rancid.  They also protect our cells from free radicals which can damage molecules in our cells and contribute to ageing and diseases like cancer.
  4. Because of all the fiber, chia seeds can absorb 10-12 times their weight in water.  They become gel-like and expand in the stomach which should keep me full longer and make me eat less!!  Wouldn’t that be nice?!

For more information on chia seeds, click here because their info is evidence-based and not controlled by sponsors.  And this article has a great explanation about why chia seeds aren’t a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, even though they do contain a significant amount. Another great post on the topic is from Helen Sanders of www.healthambition.com and you can read it here.

I’m not always the most experimental eater and, had we not bought ourselves a cool grocery store/café, I might not have ever tried chia pudding.  Maybe this chia experience will help me to be more adventurous at the next industry food show that I attend.  We’ll see. – Liz Sacchini

 

 

How I Got Our Kids to Eat Veggies and A FREE GIVE AWAY!!

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I have a really great way to get kids to eat almost all veggies, including Brussels sprouts! I found a product over ten years ago called Sale Alle Erbe delle Marlunghe at Dean and Deluca, a gourmet food and kitchen wares store, while on a wine tasting adventure in Napa. It’s a savory herb salt that makes EVERYTHING taste better. I only bought one jar and imagine my dismay when it was all gone. We put it on so many dishes from meat and potatoes to pasta and veggies to salads….you get it. But the best part was what happened when I put it on roasted veggies. The kids ate them like candy!! The salt is so amazing that I even mail it to our daughter in Boston when she runs out. And she runs out a lot! She could order it online from a store in Sacramento, but she would rather have me mail it to her. Imagine that!!

The reason it’s so good is the dried herbs and salt aren’t just mixed together. The herbs and garlic are put into the salt while they are fresh and then the salt dehydrates them, extracting all the aromatic oils and flavors into the salt.

I brought eight jars (I couldn’t get ten) over to Kauai last week when I snuck in a quick trip to check out the new Juice Bar @ Living Foods. It is heavenly and you should not miss it on your next adventure to Poipu! I even got Jeff out of the market for a bit to spend fun time cruising on the North Shore and camping at Polihale. All in only 5 days. I love that your camping essentials are a bathing suit, towel and sunscreen and you are set. Although 4-wheel drive, an air mattress, blanket, food, and beverages don’t hurt either! Oh, and don’t forget the camping permit.

Now for the best part of my blog post…the give away at Living Foods. Shop in the market and cafe and be one of the first eight customers to spend $50 in one visit, mention the give away and we’ll give you a jar of salt for free!

My autumn recipe suggestion to use with the salt is to cut up Kauai’s sweet and crunchy carrots, local sweet potatoes, yellow potatoes, and eggplant and toss them in olive oil, sprinkle with the salt and some pepper and roast at 425 degrees for approximately 30 minutes. Turn on convection if your oven has it for even better roasting. Then, add some broccoli florets, onion, and red bell pepper that have been cut into bite size pieces and lightly coat in olive oil and continue to roast until all the veggies are cooked and slightly charred. At this point, taste and add more salt if needed. This is definitely my go to side dish for many fall and winter evenings. Put a fried egg on top after taking out of the oven and it’ a meal!

The Juice Bar @ Living Foods

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In case you haven’t heard, we opened a juice bar at Living Foods Gourmet Market and Cafe! Jeff and Howard asked me to write something about it so I took that to mean they wanted my opinion. Every day that I get to give my solicited opinion is like Christmas.

What do I think of juicing? Well the first thing that comes to mind is how excited I am because this means when our girls are on island, they will have easy access to all the fruit and veggie goodness they need. We have 5 girls between our 2 families, not including us moms, and it will be so awesome for them to have no excuses for getting their 5-7 servings of fruits and veggies daily.

The latest info from the National Institutes of Health is that on any given day, 45% of the US population is having no servings of fruit or fruit juice and 22% have no servings of vegetables. Really? That’s depressing to me. It’s because of these statistics that we need more access to juice bars.

There is no magic formula coming out of juice bars, but they typically feature fresh, nutritious, vitamin-and-mineral and anti-oxidant loaded beverages. These vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants are needed by our bodies and we aren’t getting enough of them.

I can only postulate as to why I think the American public isn’t getting enough fruits and veggies and my opinion is:

  • Most produce requires preparation and when so many families have both parents working, there just isn’t enough time or energy to prepare the produce.
  • If not eaten within a certain time frame, it goes bad and gets thrown out. Fresh produce can be expensive, especially if it’s organic, and this is a risk a lot of families don’t want to take.
  • Kids don’t generally like the bitterness of many veggies so parents aren’t wasting their time serving them.
  • Fruit as a snack isn’t nearly as appealing as cookies and candy.
  • It’s just so much easier and frequently less expensive to grab fast food or prepare packaged food.

So, because of the above mentioned thoughts, my opinion is that we need more juice bars! Veggies are combined with sweet fruit juice, which cuts some of the bitterness (just a spoon full of sugar makes the medicine go down…) and juiced fruits and veggies deliver a lot of the nutrients that we are missing in the average American diet due to decrease consumption of fresh produce. These are nutrients that studies have shown are involved in decreasing our risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and even mental health disorders. The mental health connection is due to the prebiotic nature of many fruits and vegetables, but I’m saving that for another post!!

One last bit of info – certain important nutrients in vegetables are more available to our body if the vegetable has been cooked, other nutrients are more nutritious if eaten raw so the take home is this – don’t let juicing fully replace your consumption of fruits and vegetables but use it in addition.

See you at the Juice Bar @ Living Foods!

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How to Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

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This is a topic near and dear to my heart because my husband suffers from White Coat Hypertension. Ever heard of it? It’s the phenomenon that occurs when having your blood pressure taken during a doctor visit. Just being at the appointment can cause anxiety and thus blood pressure to rise. Anyway, Jeff is very disciplined about diet and exercise, other than the occasional Bubba Burger! In fact, most mornings he can be found running 5-7 miles in and around Poipu! As a result of his mostly-good habits, he has rarely needed to go to the doctor. But on the few occasions when a trip to the doctor or hospital is required such as a check-up or stitches from an errant elbow during a basketball game, he is a wreck. He even hates visiting friends or family at the hospital. So funny for a fearless guy!! Well, funny to me but not funny to him. So when he has his blood pressure taken, it’s higher than 120/80, he flips out because his BP is high, and then it goes higher!!  This is obviously not an uncommon problem or it wouldn’t have a name. It might also be genetic as our oldest daughter also suffers from White Coat Hypertension.

How does White Coat Hypertension differ from clinical Hypertension? Clinical Hypertension is where your blood pressure exceeds 120/80 in a non-agitated state. The upper number, which is always the larger number, measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart muscle contracts as in a heartbeat, and the lower number measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart is at rest, between beats. The upper number is called systolic pressure and the lower is the diastolic.

Which brings me to how you can lower it naturally. According to the Institute of Medicine, most American women consume less than half the recommended amount of potassium, men just a bit more than women. Potassium can lower systolic blood pressure by anywhere from 3-7 points as well as blunt the effects of salt, reduce the risks of kidney stones, and decrease bone loss.

Adults should consume at least 4.7 grams of potassium/day to achieve the above effects and some potassium rich foods include:

  • Bananas
  • Potatoes (include the skin)
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Greens
  • Mushrooms
  • Halibut
  • Tuna
  • Tomatoes
  • Oranges and grapefruit
  • Cantaloupe and honeydew

I want to focus on bananas because we carry the best bananas grown on island from Kapaa Banana Company! They are smaller, sometimes half the size, of the bananas seen on the mainland and they’re called apple bananas because they have a faint green apple flavor. They are the perfect size for a snack or a kid’s lunch with no leftover banana to turn brown and mushy. I like to take the really ripe ones, peel them, cut them up into 1 inch segments, and then put each cut up banana in it’s own ziplock bag in the freezer. All ready for smoothies and then I don’t have to add ice, which waters down the taste, to make it thick.

Fun facts about bananas:

  • Mai’a is the Hawaiian word for banana
  • Early Polynesians introduced bananas and they were taboo for women.
  • It was considered bad luck to dream of bananas, to meet a man carrying bananas, or to take them in fishing canoes.
  • Bananas don’t grow on trees, they grow on giant perennial herbs.
  • A bunch of bananas is called a “hand.”
  • They are available year round on Kauai.

Lastly, if you want to learn more about how potassium can lower your blood pressure, help prevent bone loss, and why it’s better to get potassium from foods instead of supplements, here’s a great article that’s easy to understand and is found in one of my frequently read science nerd publications.

 

 

Caffeine and Body Fat

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Kind of a loaded title but I can’t think of anyone who isn’t interested in losing, or at least not gaining, body fat! And there is something I learned in school many semesters ago and that is that caffeine, through a fairly simple metabolic process, helps our body mobilize fat and encourages working muscles to use this fat as a fuel source. In other words, while exercising under the influence of caffeine, the body derives a greater percentage of energy from fat than from carbohydrate, which is stored in muscles and liver in the form of glycogen. This works for me because I have to start my day with coffee, I am a morning exerciser, and coffee is a great source of caffeine. So there you have it! So simple. And we, at Living Foods, can help you!!

We buy our coffee unroasted from different islands – Kona coffee from the Big Island of Hawaii, a reserve coffee grown exclusively on the North Shore of Oahu, Peaberry Coffee from Maui, and Kauai Coffee from right here on Kauai. Kauai Coffee, with 3,100 acres and 4 million trees, happens to be the largest coffee plantation in the US!! Anyway, we then roast the beans in our store, bag them, and put our Living Foods labels on them.

We also carry roasted and packaged coffee from Kicking Horse Coffee out of Canada and Roger’s Family Organic from the San Francisco Bay Area.

An interesting fact: if you’ve ever heard of peaberry, it’s a coffee where only one of the beans inside the fruit gets fertilized and grows. Normally two beans grow in the fruit, side by side, which is why coffee beans have a flat side. Not peaberry! It gets its name from its round shape that occurs because it doesn’t grow next to another bean. Normally about 5% of beans harvested are of this form.

A few more interesting facts about coffee and caffeine I’ve come across as I indulge my nerdy science brain that loves to read medical journals and scientific studies are:

After you drink coffee, the caffeine is absorbed in the bloodstream and travels to the brain. From there, it blocks an inhibitory neurotransmitter, which increases the amount of other neurotransmitters, which in turn increases the firing of neurons. This has been shown to improve memory, mood, energy levels (duh), reaction times, and general cognitive function. Who wouldn’t want all that?

  • Coffee contains essential nutrients: Vit B2, Vit B5, manganese, potassium, magnesium, and niacin.
  • Observational studies have shown that coffee drinkers have a 23-50% lower risk of developing Type II diabetes.
  • There appears to be an ingredient in coffee that helps protect against cirrhosis of the liver.
  • In several studies, it has been shown that there is a 32-60% lowered risk of developing Parkinson’s disease in coffee drinkers due directly to the caffeine.
  • Coffee has been found to have protective effects against certain cancers ie. liver and colorectal.
  • And lastly- coffee has been found to be the biggest source of antioxidants in the western diet!!

So brew yourself a cup of coffee and start burning more fat, preventing yucky diseases, and antioxidizing your body!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Mango Story

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My mango story goes like this: I’ve revealed before that many years ago I was a nanny in Switzerland. I have also mentioned that it was my job to be first out of bed to get the coffee on, make the kid’s lunches, and prepare breakfast. The youngest of my charges was Sascha and he insisted on having a mango in his lunch every day. I had never tried a mango because back then they weren’t shipped around the world. However, the family I worked for had the resources ($) to get these juicy treats year around.  Needless to say, it was love at first bite! It was so hard when I came home because it was a few years before I was able to consistently find mangos in the US.  And then we bought a home on Kauai where mangos grow all over! The trees are so beautiful – big, shaggy, majestic trees that look like the fruit is dripping from it. And mango season is now! It started at the beginning of summer and will continue through about October. We have local mangos every day and we also put them in our smoothies.  So a few reasons to eat mangos, besides the taste, are:

  1. They are rich in prebiotic dietary fiber that is necessary for a healthy microbiome.
  2. They are an excellent source of antioxidants that have been found to protect against colon, breast, leukemia, and prostate cancers.
  3. Mangos are is a good source of vitamin-A, vitamin-C, vitamin-E, and B-6.
  4. They are also an excellent source of potassium, which is an electrolyte that is important in the control of heart rate and blood pressure.

One last fact that I really like is that apparently mango is the fruit least likely to contain pesticide residue. And finally I want to help with cutting up a mango. I had to be taught how to do it many years ago, and I still do it the same way. Click here for video #1 and here for video #2 that show the best methods to cut up a mango. I included the second one because I thought she was hilarious and I had never seen this method. Enjoy, Liz Sacchini!

What is our microbiome and how do probiotics help?

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New buzz words – microbiome and probiotics. I hear and see them everywhere, but the reality is, there is something significant going on here. So important that the Mayo Clinic published a primer about how physicians might incorporate research on the microbiome into their clinical practice. The Mayo Clinic has stated that,”understanding the basic concepts about the interactions between humans and their microbiome will be as important to clinicians as understanding concepts of genetics or germ theory.” Another highly respected medical research and treatment facility, The Cleveland Clinic, has weighed in with their opinion and they also see the importance of studying and understanding the role of the microbiome and human health.

So what is the microbiome and what are probiotics? Well first of all, the average human has 100 trillion microbes in the gut, which is 10 times more than the number of cells in the human body; hence, the bacteria and fungi known as our microbiome that inhabit our bodies vastly outnumber our human cells. These 100 trillion cells are made up of bacteria, eukaryotes, and viruses and they live in our gut, our whole digestive tract, our reproductive tract, on our skin, and even in our nose!! They weigh in at about 3 pounds total! And are involved in the health of our immune system, digestion, metabolism, appetite, and mental health. Not only do they help us to digest what we eat, in that process of digestion, they produce metabolites such as vitamins and neurotransmitters that our bodies depend on. Our gut is responsible for producing more of the neurotransmitter serotonin than is our brain. The problem is, the modern American diet has changed so much over the years that we don’t consume the microbes that we used to and in turn, are exposed to microbial-killing antibiotics and antimicrobials on a daily basis. Think of all the antibiotics that are prescribed, plus the antibiotics we consume from the meat we eat. On top of that, we are constantly exposed to all the different sources of antimicrobial soaps, hand washes, hand sanitizers, etc.  Another exposure to microbes most Americans don’t get is time spent getting up close and personal with the outdoors by gardening, working in the yard, etc. Those activities expose us to all the different microbes living in the soil. Enter probiotics. It’s a category of foods and supplements we can consume to help re-colonize our microbiome. There are probiotics in pill form that you can get over the counter and in prescription form, but there are also really great foods that contain the healthy micrboes our microbiome needs. Any fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, kimchi, and pickles contain “live-culture” microbes as do cultured foods like yogurt and kefir. You can also maintain a healthy microbiome by consuming kombucha, which is a beverage that begins with a fermented base, called a SCOBY – symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast.  It ferments for a period of time and, when it is ready to consume, is a cocktail of live microbes!

So that brings me back to Living Foods and what we have to offer in probiotics. We have lots of different beverages containing healthy microbes including our local Kauai Juices, We have a really great cottage cheese that is organic and contains live cultures, as well as yogurts, sauerkraut, pickles, and kimchi. Here is a recipe made with kimchi for a soup that I love! Eat and//or drink any of these foods and you will be giving yourself a daily inoculation of healthy microbes!

To learn more about the microbiome, here are some great articles and websites:

http://humanfoodproject.com/going-feral-one-year-journey-acquire-healthiest-gut-microbiome-world-heard/

http://discovermagazine.com/galleries/zen-photo/m/microbiome

http://www.drfranklipman.com/build-a-better-microbiome/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IN CELEBRATION OF OUR NEW GLUTEN FREE PIZZA CRUST: A GLUTEN FREE COOKIE RECIPE!!!

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For the past couple years, I have made my best effort to eat gluten free but, since I don’t have celiac disease, I give myself the liberty of eating gluten when the situation calls for it.  Like when there are cookies anywhere within reach.  Definitely my kryptonite.  And unfortunately I haven’t found a gluten free cookie I like, probably because they are all made with a funky flour like rice or corn substituted for wheat flour.  But I did find a recipe on the back of my oatmeal from Trader Joes and it contained NO flour at all, just oats.  So I thought I would try it.  So good!!  Not a replacement for an old fashioned, crispy-on-the-outside-chewy-on-the-inside oatmeal cookie or an oatmeal scotchie from my childhood which, by the way, was mouthwatering for 2 reasons- the butterscotch chips and the fact that no one ever put raisins in oatmeal scotchies, but a whole new experience that is equally as perfect.  So if you’re craving a cookie and you’re trying to keep gluten out of your diet, I highly recommend this recipe.  A couple things I experienced- don’t overcook, 12:00 minutes seemed perfect and I noticed the chocolate chips don’t want to incorporate into the dough, which was very weird.  Almost like a science experiment where the dough repelled the chips but I persevered and overcame by pushing them back in to every scoop I put on the baking sheet.  I’ll be curious to see if anyone else has this problem!!

What is Gluten?

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If you haven’t heard of gluten by now, you have definitely been living under a rock. In Siberia. So what is gluten, why is it so bad, and why do people need to be free of it? I hate the term gluten-free. It sounds like you’re being held hostage by gluten. Why can’t we be gluten-less instead of gluten-free? On the other hand, anyone who has a real problem with gluten probably does feel as if they’re being held hostage because the symptoms are very uncomfortable and can be extremely serious, even life threatening for some.

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and spelt, and the hard thing is, these grains are found in almost everything with carbohydrate in it. Although spelt not so much. Even if you try to use grains that don’t sound like these ingredients, you will find yourself eating gluten. Examples are couscous, tabbouli (bulgar), and triticale- these, which are all wheat products. Oats are supposed to be gluten-free but there can be cross-contamination in the facility where they are processed. Confusion. So you need to read labels carefully.

Why is gluten “bad”?

Well there is a condition called celiac disease and the simplest way to explain it is 2 different proteins make up gluten and can be identified by your immune system as invaders. This triggers an immune response that involves the digestive tract and can cause irreversible damage to your intestines over time. The symptoms of celiac disease are pretty severe and there are definitive tests to determine if you have it. The other condition that prompts people to go gluten-free is called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. This condition is much more vague and subjective but seems to be very real nonetheless. There is no real test for this, the best way to see if you might have it is to eat a gluten-free diet for at least 4 weeks and see how you feel. I did this about a year and a half ago and I did notice a difference but I would say it took about 3 months. My family says it’s all in my head but I have suffered from IBS my whole life and I do feel getting gluten out of my diet helped. The problem is, when I’m home in CA, raising our daughter and eating simply, I do fine eating gluten-free but when I go to Kauai, I can’t wait to try all the newest items at Living Foods and that includes pizzas, sandwiches, pasta, etc., all full of gluten! Fortunately we have a whole gluten-free section in the store filled with all kinds of gluten-free options. We’re even working on a gluten-free pizza crust but my absolute favorite gluten-free items are the crepes in the cafe. They are such a treat and they totally satisfy my craving for an ooey-gooey carbo bomb, especially the ham and melted cheese crepe.

The last thing I’ll say about a gluten-free diet is that it doesn’t mean you will lose weight. As a matter of fact, many people gain weight on gluten-free because, for some reason, they think that as long as a food is gluten-free, they can have as much as they want. The only way to lose weight is to expend more calories through activity than you consume. End of story. The other reason people gain weight is due to the fact that when you remove the grain that has gluten in it, it has to be replaced with something and frequently it is replaced with sugar, highly processed rice, potato, or corn flour, and fat. And because these flours are highly processed, they contain less fiber. So in going gluten-free, be sure to read labels to watch for the amount of fat grams, simple carbs, and calories if weight loss is your goal.

For more info on gluten, here are a few articles with easy to understand explanations and interesting information:

http://authoritynutrition.com/modern-wheat-health-nightmare/

http://www.livescience.com/37855-gluten-free-craze.html

http://www.gffoodservice.org/certified-directory/certified-food-services/

This last link is to a website that promises to list national food establishments/restaurants with gluten-free options but they are still working on it so check back!

 

Kauai Vacation Activity and Auntie Phoebe’s Marinade Recipe

First, here’s a tourist tip for visitors on the south shore of Kauai. I was on Kauai with our youngest daughter to spend Easter with Jeff, Howard, and the rest of the family. It was great to be back and we had another fun field trip, but this time it wasn’t for the store. Our girls love to go to the Kauai Humane Society! I’ve been to a lot of animal shelters in my time but this is the best. It isn’t sad or depressing – the animals are so well cared for and the staff are very friendly. You can even adopt a dog for the day!! They give the dog a vest to wear so wherever you take them, everyone around sees they are adoptable and the best is taking them to the beach. I highly recommend single guys vacationing or living on Kauai pick out the cutest dog, adopt for the day, and go to the beach. It’s a great way to meet girls and an amazing way to give back to such a beautiful place and a wonderful organization. We weren’t able to do the adopt-for-the-day this time because we had too much going on, but we did spend a lot of time visiting with the dogs.

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We really had to work hard to maintain when we saw these guys! Not only are they brothers, I think they go to the same dentist. Haven’t laughed that hard in a long time. And one of them is named Keith! Ever met a dog-named Keith? And if you’re a feline lover at all, it’s so fun to go into the cattery (sounds creepy but that is what they call it!) to play with the cats. Fell in love with this guy because he was so sweet and loved his tail!! Anyway- going to the humane society doesn’t sound like a vacation activity but it really is on Kauai.

So on to my recipe – I think it’s best on pork and chicken both of which are available at our butcher counter at Living Foods. Our chicken comes from Shelton Farms and they have a really interesting history and story to tell. It is the best chicken I’ve ever had and I love cooking with it because it always seems to come out moist and tender. I think this result has more to do with the chicken than my cooking prowess. It’s hard to take credit for much when your nickname around the house is “Burn Girl.” We also have a great supplier for our pork and their meat seems to ensure a really great result when I cook with it as well. Plus it meets all our standards for quality. It always seems so easy to come up with marinades for beef but I seem to lose my creativity (as if I ever had any) when trying to come up with ideas for pork and chicken. It always seems to be the same – BBQ sauce – a million different types, or teriyaki.  I got the following recipe from my sister who of course is an aunt to our girls and my brother’s girls. Her name is Phoebe or Aunt Phoebe to our kids but on Kauai a better name is Auntie Phoebe. In Hawaii, the terms Auntie and Uncle aren’t just used for direct relations, they are used for neighbors, close friends and long time acquaintances to show respect, communicate endearment, and imply a familial bond. I love when I hear children use the terms because they are loaded with so much love and aloha. And so I’m calling the recipe Auntie Phoebe’s Marinade! She is the most creative cook and never uses a recipe as is. She always tweaks and bends it to fit the occasion. So the recipe she gave me years ago originally called for bourbon but in natural Phoebe fashion, she has decided, and brilliantly so, when on Kauai switch out rum for bourbon to make it more tropical and south-pacific tasting. And what better rum than Koloa Rum distilled right on Kauai and available at Living Foods (shameless plug!).

 Auntie Phoebe’s Marinade

  •  ½ cup Dijon-style mustard
  • ¼ cup plus 2 T bourbon, or rum, or tequila, or whatever!
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/3 cup minced scallions

Mix all of the above in a bowl, pour over meat and marinade for at least 2 hours or overnight in fridge. If you try this out, I think it will become one of your go-to recipes. We would love to see a pic on Instagram @livingfoodsmarket! – Liz Sacchini